Posted on

Army Showcase – MadDog’s Konflikt ’47 Germans

What’s up, Wargamers?! MadDog here with another army showcase! This time, it’s my Konflikt 47 German platoon!

 

May, 1947

Swamplands near New Orleans, USA.

 

Throughout the Blitzkrieg and through to the battle of Stalingrad, the 7th Panzer Division was known as the “Ghost Division” as they routinely moved forward and passed through enemy lines, disappearing like ghosts. This is why, under Rommel, this unit was specifically chosen as the Reich’s pathfinders.

Their target: New Orleans.

 

Moving forward into the American swamps, the 7th Panzer Division was refitted and equipped with state of the art radio communications in order to transmit further to units waiting in the Gulf of Mexico. In preparation for an invasion of the mainland United States, this Division moved through the swamps just like they moved through the Maginot Line; swiftly and without resistance.

 

 

This was my “write-up” for my army for Adepticon 2017. What an awesome time we all had! I will say, before we go forward, I definitely need more of the K47 specific models and units! Just my heavy Wehrmacht troops weren’t quite enough to do battle against American walkers and Tesla cannons.

So, a bit more on the background of my army.

A German fleet has made it past Allied blockades in the Atlantic and were able to find, for a short window of time, refuge in the Gulf of Mexico. The unit I created is acting as Pathfinders in order to radio back locations of enemy strongholds, if any, and areas in which a port and/or beach head can be secured.

I picked the New Orleans swamps because I’ve wanted to do a jungle themed German camouflage scheme for a long while now. So now, what you’ve all been waiting for; The Swamp Rats.

 

We’ll start off with the vehicles I used. I selected a Panzer IV H as my heavy support and two half tracks. One full sized 251/1 and the half sized 250/3.

The Panzer IV is a Tamiya 1/48 scale model kit and I was quite happy with how the camouflage pattern and weathering turned out. I wanted to make it look grimy, but not yet rusty.

Here is the Sdkfz 250/3. I chose this half track variant to stick with the theme of a pathfinder unit with a high powered radio and aerials that extend above the open top.

My sniper team is another part of this army that I’m very happy with. I’ve only recently started individually basing teams and team weapons, but I’m thoroughly enjoying it. It makes for a more dynamic looking display, and is easier (especially with MMG teams) to keep track of casualties.

Here is my Officer and his assistant, both armed with STG-44’s. Being that Operation Creole took place in 1947, I made sure there were plenty of Assault Rifles in this particular platoon, including in the hands of the command staff.

For the standard infantry, I used the camouflage pattern only on the zeltbahn with tan helmets and green pants. I wanted to go for what made the most sense as far as historical patterns and how they would have progressed as the war went on.

And now, on to the heavy infantry.

With this unit, I decided to use the tiger striping camouflage pattern on the entirety of the armor, but kept consistent with the tan helmets. These models are really cool as they are, so I was very pleased with how they looked after applying the camo.

And last but certainly not least, I had a heavy Panzerschreck team.

And that’s the entire force. The most fun I had was creating the display board.

Who else has their K47 armies ready for action?!

Posted on

Featured Review: Konflikt ’47, Wehrmacht Heavy Infantry and LMG Team

What’s up, wargamers! Mad Dog here with my first review of 2017! I decided to start off with a review of one of Warlord Games’ newest systems, Konflikt ’47. The first things I noticed about these models is the serious “cool factor” they carry with them. This is a kit that makes you say “dang, that’s cool” just by looking at the box. That being said, this kit has been one of the easiest pewter kits I’ve had the honor of working with. From the ease of cleaning to their assembly, these models were very very easy to work with. As soon as they came out of the box, they were looking very cool indeed. Here is a pair that’s been built and primed.

 

The first thing that popped out to me was the new plate armor and what look like respirators(?) on the gear bags. It’s a pretty intriguing mix of historical gear and new “cool” gear.

As you can see here on the LMG unit, there aren’t very many pieces altogether. Legs and body are one piece, which is always nice. The arms and rifle are a single piece as well, which amounted to a few less steps in itself.

Here, on the arms, there is very minimal flash and although the rifle tips are bent, it was very easy bending back and into place. I had zero problems with any rifles’ barrels snapping off. This is something I can’t say for all pewter kits I’ve worked with in the past. There are also minimal mold lines. I only had to whip out my trusty file for a few seconds per shoulder pad.

The heads came with gas masks and a couple without. The only mold lines to be handled here are on the top of the helmet, which is par for the course. This is another “cool factor” for this kit. Just one more time I caught myself saying, “dang, this is cool”.

First, I assembled a pair of them and primed them with Vallejo Grey (74.601) Surface Primer through my airbrush. This is my preferred way of priming infantry models. The details all very clearly pop out and the “cool factor” really comes to life at this point.

Also, as a side note, I’ve found that priming models with such a light color really helps to bring out any missed mold lines or imperfections that I’ve missed in the initial cleaning process. Here, I missed a couple mold lines and it’s very easy to see them. This gives me a chance to do a final check before I start laying down paint.

So, all in all, this is a very cool kit. I’m very much looking forward to revealing my super secret, eyes only, confidential plans that I have for these models with all of our subscribers. Until then, Mad Dog gives the Wehrmacht Heavy Infantry and the Heavy LMG Infantry kits BOTH 5 star reviews. Expect a very easy cleaning session and a very high “cool factor” with these models.

Until next time, wargamers! Mad Dog, out!

Posted on

[WIP] Pacific Island

After Operation Sting 2015 we are looking at making a new board for the Bolt Action events at Adepticon 2016.

I started a test for a Pacific Island themed board, this is a 6 in. wide by 12 in. deep segment and was used as a proof of concept for the basic terrain needed for the board, and to test colors, techniques and to work out a procedure to use for the full board.

Flora was excluded from this example.

Posted on

Work in progress shot of IJA infantry

A Work in progress shot of some IJA infantry for bolt action
A Work in progress shot of some IJA infantry for Bolt Action

I have started building an IJA force for my roommate in order to get him rolling dice with us up at Draxtar.

Here is a shot of the first five infantry models. I am using the Army Painter system, which after a few failed attempts on my own models, is really starting to produce pleasing results.

Once they are based these guys will be ready for any tournament and would be a prime example of our Advanced Tabletop level of painting.

I will post more photos as more models reach the final stage.

Stay tuned for updates and contact us if you want an army painted that you will be proud to field on the battlefield.

Thanks for reading,
Bolt Action Mark, Out!

Posted on

Completed – German Sd.Kfz 234/2 “Puma”

This was a fun, and unexpected project. I wanted to brush the dust off of my airbrush skills before I worked on something serious.

However, once I got paint flowing though the brush it just wouldn’t stop.

This model was a couple firsts for me.

This is the first time I’ve exclusively used Vallejo’s Model air. For two reasons: 1) I had all the right colors due to my recent purchase of Vallejo’s German Camouflage AFV kit, and 2) the whole goal was to warm up the ol’ airbrush

image

This was the first time I stuck with a weathering plan. Typically I experiment on my personal models. This project utilized a Vallejo Model wash and a secret weapon weathering powder for the exhaust vents and the soot on the main gun.

image

First time utilizing decals, I’m typically a hand paint everything kind off guy, but since I was going for a more historically accurate project. I used Vallejo’s gloss varnish to prep the surface of the model, then micro sol & micro set to finish of the decals.

image

I plan to utilize Vallejo’s crackle medium on my next vehicle for a weathering effect.

image

image

image