Posted on

Featured Review: Konflikt ’47, Wehrmacht Heavy Infantry and LMG Team

What’s up, wargamers! Mad Dog here with my first review of 2017! I decided to start off with a review of one of Warlord Games’ newest systems, Konflikt ’47. The first things I noticed about these models is the serious “cool factor” they carry with them. This is a kit that makes you say “dang, that’s cool” just by looking at the box. That being said, this kit has been one of the easiest pewter kits I’ve had the honor of working with. From the ease of cleaning to their assembly, these models were very very easy to work with. As soon as they came out of the box, they were looking very cool indeed. Here is a pair that’s been built and primed.

 

The first thing that popped out to me was the new plate armor and what look like respirators(?) on the gear bags. It’s a pretty intriguing mix of historical gear and new “cool” gear.

As you can see here on the LMG unit, there aren’t very many pieces altogether. Legs and body are one piece, which is always nice. The arms and rifle are a single piece as well, which amounted to a few less steps in itself.

Here, on the arms, there is very minimal flash and although the rifle tips are bent, it was very easy bending back and into place. I had zero problems with any rifles’ barrels snapping off. This is something I can’t say for all pewter kits I’ve worked with in the past. There are also minimal mold lines. I only had to whip out my trusty file for a few seconds per shoulder pad.

The heads came with gas masks and a couple without. The only mold lines to be handled here are on the top of the helmet, which is par for the course. This is another “cool factor” for this kit. Just one more time I caught myself saying, “dang, this is cool”.

First, IĀ assembled a pair of them and primed them with Vallejo Grey (74.601) Surface Primer through my airbrush. This is my preferred way of priming infantry models. The details all very clearly pop out and the “cool factor” really comes to life at this point.

Also, as a side note, I’ve found that priming models with such a light color really helps to bring out any missed mold lines or imperfections that I’ve missed in the initial cleaning process. Here, I missed a couple mold lines and it’s very easy to see them. This gives me a chance to do a final check before I start laying down paint.

So, all in all, this is a very cool kit. I’m very much looking forward to revealing my super secret, eyes only, confidential plans that I have for these models with all of our subscribers. Until then, Mad Dog gives the Wehrmacht Heavy Infantry and the Heavy LMG Infantry kits BOTH 5 star reviews. Expect a very easy cleaning session and a very high “cool factor” with these models.

Until next time, wargamers! Mad Dog, out!

Posted on

Blitzkrieg Miniatures M4A3E8 “Easy 8” Model Unboxing

So about a month ago, I was turned on to a company across the pond called Blitzkrieg Miniatures. I was especially thrilled to see that they offered models in the ever elusive 1/56th scale, as to conform with the rest of my bolt action army. So, after paroozing their web store, and freshly seen Fury, I decided to add an Easy 8 to my American motor pool.

20141229_145544[1]

Above is how the model arrived at my door. Nothing fancy in terms of packaging, but the model was well protected, so i really couldn’t ask for much more. The main hull of the tank was well wrapped in a medium bubble wrap very snugly, as was the main turret body. The accessories were, on the other hand just placed in a small zip lock bag. This mildly worried me off the bat as the whole model was resin cast.

20141230_020302[1]

But, my worries were soon put to rest and exchanged with excitement as the model was, pardon my french, fucking BEAUTIFUL! After my initial look over, the details were stunning and there was very little clean up work to be done. This was surprising to me as I have dealt with solid cast resin models in the past that were absolute nightmares to clean and assemble *cough cough, Warlord, cough cough*.

20150101_135600[1]

In no time at all the model was cleaned, assembled (all whopping 8 parts of it) and ready to start laying paint on (as it is, I have a fair amount of custom work I will be doing to it so it can accurately mirror the easy 8 in Fury, stay tuned as I will be showing this bad boy off as it gets finished).

20150101_135614[1]

So all in all, I am absolutely blown away by the quality in workmanship from Blitzkrieg and will definitely be ordering more models from them in the future. For those interested, the 1/56th Sherman Easy 8 retails from Blitzkrieg Miniatures for 22 GBP (which is roughly 35 American) and, to entice you all a bit more, free worldwide shipping on everything.

For their full catalog, tap the link below and enjoy the myriad of amazing models they offer.

http://www.blitzkriegminiatures.com/

20150101_135630[1]

As I said above, Ill be posting more updates on my E8 as it gets more Furry like.

Thanks for reading and thanks to Paul from Blitzkrieg for the awesome customer support! Keep gaming everyone and have a happy 2015!

Posted on

Unboxing the Rubicon Models Panzer III

I recently received my Rubicon Models Panzer III Mid War box that I had picked up for a very reasonable price at NWS Online. Since I had not seen, any reviews for any of the products from Rubicon I decided to write up a quick unboxing of the kit and will follow up with a build review, once I have it together.

First Impressions

Opening up the box was a routine matter at this point in my career of new kits. However, as with any new kit I still become a little child that starts bouncing around in his seat in anticipation.

The box looks great, professional graphics on the front and back. It is plastered with the typical “Not assembled and not painted” notices all over the box. Sometime I get the feeling that the manufactures are apologizing for not building or painting the model for me, but for me, that is the whole reason I gave you my hard-earned money. I love the hobby.

The Guts of the Kit

The kit consists of three sprues, a waterslide decal sheet, and a four-page instruction manual.

Getting down and taking a close look at the sprues, I am quite pleased with my initial inspection. The mold lines are clean and should not be an issue to clean up and the detail is quite good.

There are some noticeable differences between a Warlord Games’ resin kit and the Rubicon plastic one. Below you can see a quick snap of a side by side of the two kits. My primed Warlord model on the left and the Rubicon on the right. The most noticeable difference is the depth of the details. The Warlord model has the detail protruding more from the surface of the model than the Rubicon does. Does this really change my opinion on the model; no. Will this affect the outcome of the final product; I do not believe so. My only thought is that if there details are less pronounced on the Rubicon model compared to its Warlord counterpart, will the details get lost while the model is on the game board.

The Rubicon model does have more fine detailing work around the panel lines, a couple spare wheels on the side and a different arrangement of tools.

At this stage, I believe the two kits are comparable.

The decal sheet does have more than enough numbers to accurately tag this vehicle for either DAK or one of the European fronts. I am very excited because I can use the decals that I will not use on the Rubicon model to tag my two other Panzer III’s from Warlord because Warlord appears to always be out of stock on the red vehicle numbers that I am after.

I did notice that the DAK palm tree decals do actually have the swastika on them. The only reason I mention this is that on a recent podcast I listed to the hosts had a small diatribe on their comfort levels of painting swastikas on the side of their tanks or if they would forgo the need to be historically accurate and omit the iconography.

That is all from me for now. I will be posting soon with a review of the assemble process for this kit.

Happy Hunting Mercenaries!
Mark